DISCOVER MORE ABOUT

PERU ORGANIC

FRUITY AND ELEGANT

PERU ORGANIC, OUR FIRST ORGANIC COFFEE

 

We traveled across remote Peruvian regions in search of the finest organic certified arabica coffee beans. High up above 3280 ft – even up to 6890 ft – tucked into the slopes of the Andes, we found them. Made with organic processes passed down from generation to generation, this coffee is blessed with the meticulous care of smallholder farmers. Peru Organic is split-roast to reveal both the bright, juicy acidity and the elegant fruity notes accented by a smooth, toasted cereal note.

ORIGIN

In Peru, the Andes extend from north to south, separating the coastal desert from the tropical rain forest. Coffee grows here – high up in the Andes – between 3280 and 6890 ft. It’s a subtropical highland climate where the high humidity levels and altitude improve the quality potential of the coffee beans.

 

ROASTING

After going to such great lengths to source the finest organic Peruvian coffee, it was only natural to take the same care in roasting this coffee. Peru Organic is a single-origin coffee roasted in two parts to bring a nuanced complexity to the final cup. The two splits are lightly roasted and highlight the bright and smooth character of the blend while revealing the exotic fruity notes.

AROMATIC PROFILE

Peru Organic is a fruity coffee with distinct green vegetable notes. The coffee’s fine acidity is beautifully balanced by its contrasting aromas of toasted sweet cereals.

BIOLOGICAL AGRICULTURE PRACTICES GENERATION FROM GENERATION

Fertilizing.
Homemade fertilizers such as compost and bio-ferments. The compost is made in the farmers’ back yards using material available in the farms, primarily coffee cherry pulp, banana skins, and Guinea Pig or chicken droppings. The Guinea Pigs, locally named Cuy, are animals that live on the farms and eat leafy greens from the coffee plantations. In turn, they also form part of the farmers’ own diet.

 

Weeding.
A key process in the organic farming, weeding refers to the manually cleaning of the bad grasses that are around the coffee tree trunk and compete for the land’s nutrients. However, the grasses that cover the corridors between coffee tree lines, are left to help avoid erosion of the soil and to maintain the microflora.

 

Planting.
Farmers plant a variety of plants around the coffee trees – such as lucuma, guava, and laurel – that provide shade to the coffee trees, as well as plants such as corn, yucca, banana and beans that provide food for the farmers and to the farmers’ animals.

50 per box

INTENSITY

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